Saturday, April 15, 2017

Join the Campaign to Repeal the California Car Tax





With virtually no notice to the public, Democratic politicians in the California State Legislature crammed through a massive hike to the Car Tax and Gas Tax.
Fortunately, former San Diego City Councilman Carl DeMaio has unveiled a strategy for getting citizens involved in overturning these tax hikes! More on that in a bit, but first you need to understand how these tax hikes will cost YOU!
Car Tax: Pay More, Get Less!
Depending on the value of your car, miles were driven, and your MPG, the typical California family will end up paying $350-700 more per year under the Car Tax and Gas Tax hike!
What’s worse, the money is spent with virtually zero accountability for fixing roads! In fact, Californians already pay the highest gas tax in the country and yet we still have the worst roads. For every $1 in average costs for road repairs spent in the other 49 states in the US, California spends $4.7 dollars for the same repairs – resulting in wasteful spending of 470 percent more!
“Politicians have been caught stealing gas tax monies and recent audits show billions in waste that should be going to road repairs,” notes Carl DeMaio. “The Car Tax and Gas Tax hike contain zero reforms of wasteful spending, meaning we are throwing good money after bad,” DeMaio warns.
The Gazelle Strategy to Repeal the Car Tax: Recalls!
California Democrats were able to pass the Car Tax and Gas Tax Hike because they hold a 2/3rds Super-Majority in both houses of the state legislature. We have two choices: run an initiative to roll back the Car Tax – which must be done statewide. OR we can fix the real problem which is removing the Democrats from their Super-Majority status by targeting their weakest members for Recall campaigns in 2017 or defeat in 2018.
Think of this strategy as the “Gazelle Strategy.” If you have seen Animal Planet, you know that lions hunt for food not by attacking an entire pack of Gazelles at once, but targeting the weakest gazelle and taking that one gazelle out. Far more efficient and an almost guaranteed success rate.
Our campaign to repeal the Car Tax utilizes the Gazelle Strategy. That’s why we propose to launch a Recall Campaign against State Senator Josh Newman (D-Orange County).
Senator Josh Newman won by less than 1% of the vote in 2016 – and yet he betrayed his constituents by voting for the Car Tax and Gas Tax hikes.
Our campaign intends to file Recall Papers in the next month against Senator Newman and collect 60,000 valid signatures to force him from office.
After we succeed in recalling Josh Newman, Democrats will lose their Super Majority and will not be able to arbitrarily raise our taxes.
Then we will demand that California Democrats repeal the Car and Gas Tax Hikes – or we will file additional Recall Elections against more of their members. We will also use the Car Tax as the big issue to defeat their candidates in 2018.
We need YOU to join our campaign today – help repeal the Car Tax!

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Twilight Landing at LAX Cockpit View (VIDEO) feat Peter Gabriel Remix



Love I get so lost, sometimes

days pass and this emptiness fills my heart

when I want to run away
I drive off in my car
but whichever way I go
I come back to the place you are



Ladies and gentlemen, this is your Captain speaking, welcome to Los Angeles.Landing at LAX International Airport via the SADDE Six Arrival.

How to Feel Better When You're Feeling Down





1) Accept the negative feelings.
The key to this is not to deny what we are feeling, but rather to lean into our feelings, even if they are painful. Take a moment to be mindful and narrate: "I'm feeling anxious right now," or, "This situation is making me tense." Hang in there with unpleasant feelings at least long enough to acknowledge them.
This is the gist of emotion coaching kids: We help them label what they are feeling, and we validate that their feelings are okay. With younger kids, the challenge is helping them understand that while bad feelings are always all right, bad behavior never is. Be crystal clear about this. For example, it is totally okay that your child is feeling jealous and hateful toward her sister. At the same time, it is never okay to hit her.
2) Problem solve.
What did you learn from that embarrassing situation? What can you do to improve a difficult situation tomorrow? Who else can help? Who do you need to forgive before you'll feel better? Put a plan into place.
3) Let goMove onTry to feel better.
This means that we make a genuine effort to cultivate happiness, gratitude, hope or any other positive emotion; researchers call this "deep acting."
Faking a smile or other pleasantries to cover our negative emotions (what researchers call "surface acting") without actually trying to change our underlying negative emotions will often make us feel worse rather than better. But when we genuinely try to feel more positive -- when we do try to change our underlying feelings -- we usually end up feeling fewer negative emotions and more positive emotions.
Most often, moving on means distracting ourselves or our children from the situation. We need to leave the scene of the crime, so to speak. In my next post, I'm going to give you a nice long list of techniques that my kids and I use to keep ourselves from overthinking difficult situations, and to move on when we want to feel better.
What negative situations do you find yourself overthinking? Do you notice your children ruminating about certain situations?

© 2011 Christine Carter, Ph.D.


Do you have Face Blindness? Take a test (Video)



Lesley Stahl reports on people who are "face blind." It's a mysterious and sad condition that keeps sufferers from recognizing or identifying faces-- even the faces of close family members, children, or spouses. Many "face blind" people don't even know they have it.




If you suspect you might be "face blind," in the above video, you'll find a test that may provide an answer. We show you a series of pictures of famous people and ask you to figure out who they are.If you have trouble identifying the faces in our te suggest
that you check out  http://www.faceblind.org/facetests/


You can learn about face blindness and take other tests created by Professor Brad Duchaine and his colleagues at Dartmouth College.

By 60 Minutes Overtime Staff

" Not Just What You Say" (VIDEO)


Not just what you say {It's mostly what you do}
Not a game that you play {To keep the winning hand with you}
Not just wasting time {With empty words that don't mean much}
Not just how you feel {When others need your tender touch}
So can you take out some time {To help somebody else in need}
And when this is done {The love of God is truly seen}
Then above all {We need to cover and forgive}
Then we can act like we know what love is


Not just what you say
Then we can act like we know what love is...
[Verse 1:]
When you say how are you doin'
Do you really wanna know
And are you concerned, yeah
And if you had the solution
But it took some of your time or some cash or whatever
Are you willing
[Chorus:]
Not just what you say {It's mostly what you do}
Not a game that you play {To keep the winning hand with you}
Not just wasting time {With empty words that don't mean much}
Not just how you feel {When others need your tender touch}
So can you take out some time {To help somebody else in need}
And when this is done {The love of God is truly seen}
Then above all {We need to cover and forgive}
Then we can act like we know what love is






[Verse 2:]
Love is compassion
That makes you reach way down
And help your fellow man
So if there's a need
And you can be the one
Go and help someone
 [Chorus]
 Love is all, all in all
Forgiving faults great and small
Patient and willing to
Cover me, cover you
Love is kind don't you know
And will not seek its own
God is love forever more
Act like you know go handle yours

Part of where I'm going, is knowing where I'm coming from







L.A. #Earthquake . . Be Prepared






  • Southern California has about 10,000 earthquakes each year, though most are so small that they are never felt.

  • Of those, 15-20 are greater than magnitude 4.0.

  • Large earthquakes create an aftershock sequence that can produce many additional earthquakes of all magnitudes for many months.

  • Earthquakes can occur in any type of weather - cold, hot, rainy or dry. There is no such thing as “earthquake weather.” so earthquake preparedness should be 24/7.

  • The San Andreas Fault is not a single, continuous fault, but rather a fault zone consisting of many different segments. Its fault system is more than 800 miles long.

  • Most earthquakes occur at depths of less than 50 miles below the Earth’s surface.

  • Only four states Florida, Iowa, North Dakota and Wisconsin have not had earthquakes in the past 30 years.

  • Alaska is the most earthquake-prone state, with a magnitude 7 quake or greater occurring nearly every year.











The upcoming Downtown LA Art Walk is July 11 2013. (the 2nd Thursday of every month) VIDEO




The Downtown Art Walk happens every 2nd Thursday of each month. Centralized in the area’s Historic Core district, Art Walk brings art to a wider public and gives them a new perspective on Downtown.

http://downtownartwalk.org/


Is The Internet Changing Your Brain?


Is the internet bad for our brains?

Is it affecting our ability to remember things, form meaningful relationships, or make decisions? 

How is it beneficial? Isn't having so much information at our fingertips a good thing?

I think it's important to remember that in science, answers to questions like these are rarely straightforward. Without a doubt the time we spend online changes our brains, but then again, so does everything we do. 

Our brains are highly plastic, meaning that external experience shapes our neural structure and function. But exactly how the Internet induces those changes is still something of a mystery.

By Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Beverley Knight 'Keep this fire burning' live on QVC



Even when you don't know
I'll be right by your side
Even when you think you're all alone
I'll be by your side, yeah





I'll be right behind you
Keep on going
In whichever way the wind is blowing
I'll be there 'til the
World stops turning
Baby I will keep this fire burning

When nobody else is
I am on your side
Baby when you're not even yourself
I am on your side

I'll be right behind you
Keep on going
In whichever way the wind is blowing
I will be there 'til the
World stops turning
Baby I will keep this fire burning

Even when you've lost your faith in love
Even when there is no light above
Even when you wanna run and hide
I'll be on your side

I don't think you even know
How far I'm about to go
If you put your trust in me
I'll keep it coming
Ain't nobody stopping me
When it comes to you and me
Nothing's like it used to be
I'll keep it coming

I'll be right behind you
Keep on going
In whichever way the wind is blowing
I will be there 'til the
World stops turning
Baby I will keep this fire burning

I don't think you even know
How far I'm about to go
If you put your trust in me
I'll keep it coming
Ain't nobody stopping me
When it comes to you and me
Nothing's like it used to be
I'll keep it coming

I'll be right behind you
Keep on going
In whichever way the wind is blowing
I will be there 'til the
World stops turning
Baby I will keep this fire burning

I will be your sister
I will be your brother
I will be your friend
I will be your lover
I will be your everything, yes I will, yeah
Baby I will keep this fire burning

Friday, July 5, 2013

Nearly 50 Percent Of Children Receive Alcohol From Parents & Relatives




By Steven Reinberg-HealthDay Reporter


(HealthDay News) -- Some 709,000 youngsters aged 12 to 14 in the United States are drinking beer, liquor and other alcoholic beverages, a new federal study found.
And the surprise is that many of these underage drinkers aren't just getting a friend to buy a six pack for them or smuggling alcohol out of the family liquor cabinet. Some are getting the alcohol directly from a parent, guardian or another adult relative.
In the past month alone, more than 200,000 kids were given alcohol by a parent or other adult family member, according to a report from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
That's not counting the youngsters who are drinking on the sly.
"About 5.9 percent of 12- to 14-year-olds have used alcohol in the past month," said Peter Delany, director of SAMHSA's Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. "That's a pretty large number."
"And almost all of these kids got that alcohol for free," he said.
In fact, about 45 percent got alcohol from a parent or other family member or they took it from their home without permission, Delany added.
About 15 percent of these kids just took the liquor, but 15.7 percent got it directly from that parent or guardian and another 14 percent got it from another relative, he said.
Why parents are giving their kids alcohol isn't clear, Delany said. "Anecdotally, parents say, 'Well, at least they are drinking at home and not on the street, or at least they are not smoking marijuana' -- all kind of silly things," he said.
"If you want to have a big impact on preventing problems with youth alcohol use, it starts at home," he said. "This is a wholly preventable behavior."
Delany suggests locking up all the liquor at home and never giving any to young children.
Although some parents may not realize it, being a regular drinker as a teen can have serious consequences in adulthood, Delany said.
"If you drink alcohol before the age of 15 you are about five times more likely to experience a serious problem with alcohol or other drug use at or after the age of 21," he explained. "That's why so many prevention programs are trying to delay kids from using alcohol, because the older you are [when you start drinking], the more judgment you have, and the less likely you are to develop problems later in life."
According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, approximately 5,000 youngsters and teens under the age of 21 die each year as a result of underage drinking, including deaths from falls, burns and drowning. Frequent binge drinkers who are underage are also more likely to get D's and F's in school and to engage in risky sexual and drug-taking behavior.
"We have to start talking to our kids about this issue. Talk to them all the time -- it's not a onetime discussion," Delany added.
Delany noted the data on very young drinkers came from the 2006 to 2009 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, which involved responses from more than 44,000 respondents aged 12 to 14. The sample was from across the country and included families from a variety of socioeconomic groups.
Dr. Gwen Wurm, an assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, said, "This is something we have known: kids do get their alcohol at home."
"As parents we need to guide our children into the kind of appropriate choices they can be making," she said.
Being open and honest about what alcohol is and its dangers to the developing brain should be an important part of the discussion, Wurm said. In addition, she said, parents need to include alcohol as part of the discussion about drugs and sex.
Another expert, David Jernigan, an associate professor at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, places much of the blame for making drinking "cool" to kids on the liquor industry.
"Youth exposure to alcohol advertising on television increased 71 percent between 2001 and 2009," he said. Kids are seeing about one advertisement for alcohol a day. "That's a great thing [if the ads are about] vitamins, but not so great for alcohol."
Jernigan thinks alcohol advertising should be restricted to venues where 12- to 20-year-olds make up only a small percentage of the viewing audience.
Parents need to play a lead role in preventing their kids from drinking, "but frankly, they could use a little more help from the alcohol industry," he said.

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Booze Makes Comeback at Work as Silicon Valley Taps IPad-Linked Kegerators



At Yelp Inc.’s San Francisco headquarters, a keg refrigerator provides a never-ending supply of beer to employees, letting them drink as much as they like.
They just have to be comfortable with full disclosure: Workers badge in to an iPad application attached to the keg that records every ounce they drink.
“If you’re at the top of the leader board consistently, I don’t know if that’s a place that you’d want to be,” said Eric Singley, director of Yelp consumer and mobile products. “Luckily, that hasn’t really even been an issue.”
In a contemporary version of “Mad Men” and its bibulous ad executives, more dot-coms are embracing the idea of drinking at work. That means keeping bars stocked at all hours, installing kegerators and letting programmers tip back a few while they code. It also raises questions about the effect of alcohol on productivity and the safety of employees.
“Alcohol is sort of a slippery slope, because obviously you’d think it might impair their performance,” said Dalton Conley,social sciences dean and professor at New York University. “Many people can work after one beer, but I doubt many people can do serious knowledge work very productively after four or five.”
While office parties and Friday-night beer busts are nothing new, the all-hours nature of startups means more employees blend their nightlife with work time. Drinking is an extension of that, said Joe Beninato, chief executive officer of Tello Inc., an app developer in Palo Alto,California.

‘We’re All Adults’

“When you’re working at a startup, you’re working 24-7 and it takes over your life,” he said. “It’s not like it’s a wild fraternity party or something like that -- we’re all adults.”
When Tello’s iPhone app for rating customer service made it into Apple Inc. (AAPL)’s online store in February, the five-person company decided to celebrate. No matter that it was before noon.
“We got out the whiskey, and everybody had a shot,” Beninato said.
Workers have a similar outlook at CrowdFlower, said Lukas Biewald, CEO of the San Francisco-based employment company.
“We do have a fridge full of beer, people do work late and drink out of it,” Biewald said. “When we first started, our office was like our home -- we had leftovers in the fridge --and I think it’s an extension of that.”

Banker Visit


It’s typical to see employees with a beer on a Friday afternoon, when the company lets workers demonstrate new projects, he said. CrowdFlower also occasionally gets kegs for gatherings it hosts for its community of developers and users.
“We had a customer from a bank come, around 11 a.m., and I was really embarrassed by the fact that we had a keg up,” Biewald said. “But he actually poured himself a drink.”
Twitter Inc., also based in San Francisco, has wine and beer in its fridge, along with nonalcoholic drinks.
“We treat employees as adults, and they act accordingly,” said Jodi Olson, a spokeswoman for the company.
Even so, the age-old problems of workplace drinking haven’t disappeared, said Robert Sutton, a professor in Stanford University’s management science and engineering department. Some employees can’t drink in moderation or control themselves after imbibing, he said.
“I’ve been involved in workplaces that can be pretty dysfunctional, where people will start drinking a little too much at lunch,” Sutton said. “There’s like a bazillion studies that show when people drink, their performance is impaired, and there’s problems with absenteeism.”

Sexual Harassment

Another danger: Women are at greater risk of sexual harassment at offices where heavy drinking is the norm, according to a 2004 Cornell University study. The report, sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, found harassment incidents increased more than twofold for each additional alcoholic beverage consumed by male co-workers.
The long hours may be what sets technology workers apart from the boozing executives on “Mad Men,” a show set in the 1960s, said New York University’s Conley.
“The folks drank a lot more alcohol back then and had three-martini lunches, but they weren’t staying until midnight finishing projects,” he said.
At Yelp, an online reviews site, the keg is meant as an after-hours activity, said Singley, who has worked for the startup more than three years.
“That’s when it gets the most use,” he said. Still, the definition of a workday can depend on the employee.
“Engineers in particular are night owls,” he said. “A little ramen noodles at 9 p.m., and then after that, winding down your day, you might stop by the keg. People work here really late.”
To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Flinn in San Francisco at rflinn@bloomberg.net